alskuefhaih
asoiefh

Sunday, February 17, 2008

broken


Some things around here were broken when I got them. Like a couple of statues that were my grandma's.



And this cognac bottle. We don't drink the cognac (too sweet). We just like the bottle and the color of cognac.





This necklace Lesley made for me broke all by itself. I swear. I love it, and I need to get it restrung.





This lamp stands by my dressing table, I don't know whose finger poked through this old silk lampshade. My dad had a collection of lamps. You wouldn't believe what a lamp fetish he had. I think we have four floor lamps out in the shed that are waiting for shades or new wiring that were his. Anyway, this one was my dad's, and probably my grandma's before that. I know, it should probably be in the shed.


This bowl got broken at Thanksgiving after the mashed potatoes were eaten, before it had a chance to get washed. I bought this Old English Johnson Brothers set at an old farm auction when Don and I were first married, and I got the whole 12-place-setting and multiple serving dish set for $55. I didn't know until later that I was bidding against my sister-in-law, who was standing behind me. This bowl only cost me a few cents, but I was sorry to see it break after all those years the old farmer woman had it and didn't break it.


I hope our kids will like some of these things when we're gone. Living with old worn and repaired treasures reminds me of the people who lived before me and used these things, admired them, dusted them, washed them, and shone light through them.

20 comments:

SwedeHart said...

Yes, I have a couple of treasures from G'ma and G'pa that were broken when I received them. A ceramic picture frame with a cherub and two crystal perfume decanters with Hawaiian women doing the luau. I love my little treasures and they travel with me everywhere I go. Can't let them go because of the history and because G'pa picked them out just for me and he took me into one of the rooms in his home and gave them to me out of the blue. He never said much, so what little verbal communication we did have is very empowering.

Heather said...

Yes, broken things are beautiful, too. Sometimes they are more beautiful broken than whole. They are the evidence of human use and love and clumsiness.

Drowsey Monkey said...

Only you could make broken things look beautiful.

Ruth said...

Swedehart, I'm guessing those were Grandma Bennett's first. I think she went to Hawaii, and she loved cherubs, as you can see from the statue at top. I know G'pa loved giving you those treasures. He loved old things too. It must have been a sweet moment in time to have him communicate that way.

Ruth said...

Oh Heather, what you said.

Ruth said...

Drowsey, I can't think of a nicer compliment than that.

Rauf said...

i am clumsy Ruth, but i really don't remember breaking anything.
I don't break but simply lose them which is worse. i am messy and not very studious. Possessions is an emotional subject. i smile at the philosophy of material and spiritual happiness. i know how i feel when i lose something very dear to me. And i can imagine how you feel when some thing very dear to you is broken. these things are a part of our lives. They are as spritual as a path to heaven. i may skip such a path for an iPOD Ruth.

Rauf said...

Heather, i am very uncomfortable in houses where everything is for display, to impress the visitor. i tell them there is no sign of life in your house, everything is dead. its like a museum.

Our museum in Chennai is like a house Heather, with nearly everything broken and glued.

Heather said...

Rauf, I'm with you. I believe in living to the fullest inside a house. A house should be lived in. A house holds our emotions: our bad moods, our mistakes, as well as our joys. Someday, I will visit your museum in Chennal. That sounds like a proper museum.

oldmanlincoln said...

So sad when things break. It is nice to see them repaired when possible too.

Ruth said...

rauf, I think what you said gets at the subtle difference between being materialistic and valuing material possessions. I actually think really valuing material things, when you connect with their essence (if that's possible), is the opposite of being materialistic, which I think is accumulating things without doing that. I think I just went round in a circle.

Ruth said...

Abraham, nice to see you here. I thought I broke my camera today, but it just needed cleaning. :|

Britt-Arnhild said...

Broken piece have alot to teach us about life.....

lesleyanne said...

i have always loved the treasures in your home. especially when you inherited so much of grandma and grandpa's lovely things. i constantly feel their spirits all around us, within the mustard yellow sofa, within the re-covered chairs, within and all around the knick-knacks.
and i love the concept, Heather and Rauf, of broken things showing the evidence of human life. like our soul resides there, in that broken piece, lying in the middle of the bowl.

lesleyanne said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
lesleyanne said...

ps - i know you didn't break that necklace! i still remember when i made that for you, oh how beautiful those stones are. i'll bring some string and put it back together when i visit next.
loves.

Ruth said...

Britt-Arnhild, yep! Are we listening?

Ruth said...

Weserey, I'm glad you love these things too.

What you said about the soul in the bowl, I always feel that when I wear the necklace you made me. I am so anxious to wear it again. Whenever I wear it, people see it right away, and complete strangers ask about it. I think it begs people to touch it, emotionally if not physically. I think you infused it with something special. Something like love.

Ginnie said...

It is so touching, Ruth, to see these precious treasures through your eyes, even though they are broken. I think there's a sermonette here about how priceless we all are, even in our brokenness!

Ruth said...

Thanks, Boots.