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Monday, December 07, 2009

Aşure - Noah's pudding

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Pronounced AH-shoo-REH.

In İstanbul in the late eighties when Don was selling kilims and copper to the U.S. market hot for Turkish stuff, and we four lived in a "marble palace" apartment (Turkish homes are sparkly with chandeliers, marble floors and countertops; we broke a few milk bottles on that unforgiving marble), on a certain special day two or three neighbors brought a dish of Noah's pudding to us. Aşure günü (say the ü with your lips rounded and a u just behind your teeth) is the holiday celebrated in Turkey on the 10th day of the Islamic lunar month of Muharrem, this year December 27. Noah's is one of the biblical stories shared by Christians, Jews and Muslims. In the Qur'an, Noah is a prophet.

The story goes that when Noah's ark landed on Mt. Ararat (in Turkey), after so much time bobbing on water with no land in sight, the inhabitants celebrated by making a pudding out of the remnants of what lay in the hold: nuts, dried fruits and grains.



The apartment neighbors who brought our bowls of Noah's pudding took a bowl of it to every neighbor in the building. Tradition says that your "neighbors" are inhabitants in forty houses to your East, West, North and South. I imagine "everyone in the building" is the adaptation for modern times. When we explained this tradition to Inge and Lar when we served them some aşure for dessert Saturday (the first time I made it), Inge (of the German steel trap mind) asked, "you mean everyone took some to everyone else? Doesn't that sort of cancel the whole thing out?" Well since we weren't taking aşure to anyone, I never thought about it.

The aşure holiday is about keeping up good relations with neighbors no matter what their religion or beliefs might be. It is common Turkish practice to make big cauldrons of aşure to distribute to the poor. Everything goes into the pot, and what is in the pot goes to everyone.



Here, Neighbor, I am sharing a bowl of aşure with you. It's nice for breakfast. If you make it, share with your neighbors and tell them you appreciate them. You can do that with fruitcake too, which is sort of the same idea, but I like this better. No, that is pudding it too mildly. I would rather toss a fruitcake than eat it. I've co-opted aşure and sharing with neighbors as a new Christmas tradition at our house. Hey, Santa Claus started in Turkey too, and look how far he got!








Aşure - Noah's pudding


2 cups instant barley, it will be much more when cooked
1 cup canned white Northern beans, washed and drained
1 cup canned chickpeas, washed and drained
1 cup sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract
10 cups water
10 dry apricots, soaked in water overnight, cut in pieces
10 dry figs, cut in pieces
1/2 cup raisins

Garnish:
1/4 cup walnuts, crumbled, slivered almonds, currants, pine nuts, pomegranate seeds

Cook barley according to directions on package. (If using non-instant barley, get it to boil on high heat. Then as soon as it boils, turn it down to medium-low heat and cook for about half an hour.) Set aside 1-2 cups of cooked barley and put into a food processor or blender. To the barley in the pot add the beans, chickpeas, vanilla, apricots, raisins, figs, sugar and 6 cups of hot water. Simmer for about 45 minutes on medium to medium-low heat. Stir occasionally. Process 1-2 cups cooked barley that you set aside in a food processor or blender, mixing water if needed to make it pudding-ish. Add this to the pot to thicken it. Cook a couple more minutes, then pour into a large service bowl and let cool.

Keep Noah's Pudding refrigerated. When serving, garnish with crumbled walnuts, roasted slivered almonds, currants, pine nuts and pomegranate seeds. The garnish is the best part, and you might think of different ones.-
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72 comments:

CottageGirl said...

What an interesting dish and a more interesting story! I would never think to combine beans and sugar and dried fruits!!
What an interesting life you've lead, Ruth! You really should write a book. You could come to St. Louis on your book tour ... and we could meet! (I'd wait hours, if necessary!)

*jean* said...

what a wonderful tradition! looks yummy too! thanks, ruth!

Gwen Buchanan said...

Ruth, They need to serve this recipe at the United Nations...

..You have created a beautiful presentation of a beautiful tradition and now, my mouth is watering...

Thank you!!

Montag said...

I may make this pudding - even though I bake and cook slower than "Noah's crow".

I may even do a fruitcake using the apricot, fig, pomegranate seeds, currants, and raisins...maybe keep the chickpeas...
you've got me thinking about baking for the holidays...

Susan said...

This dish just has it ALL going on, doesn't it?!! Beans and dried fruit in the same pot....very interesting. Too bad I'm not one of your neighbors. I would love a taste.

You don't like fruitcake, Ruthie? I think that's the first time we've had different opinions on food! Maybe you just haven't had the right one.

Cusp said...

Thanks for sharing this tradition. Sounds a really interesting mix of ingredients -- kind of medieval in the way people loved to mix meats, beans, fruits and spices in one dish (hence our mincemeat here in UK which originaly had real meat in it but is now a kind of jammy concoction of dried fruits, sugar and suet for putting in pies)

I do so envy your living in Instanbul. It's one place I've always wanted to visit.

Barry said...

I love that they have a more precise definition of neighbour. I wonder if that has changed in the internet age? Here in Toronto it now usually means the people living immediately adjacent to you.

And even then they might wonder who you were if you showed up with a pudding.

ellen abbott said...

What an interesting life. I would like to go to Turkey one day. Thank you for the story, the traditions. I think maybe I'll try this.

Love the new header btw.

Loring Wirbel said...

Wow, I like all the ingredients in this recipe, will have to try it. Had to laugh at the barley - we were talking at the boba tea house yesterday about how the boba elite (who frequent this Boulder tea house near Abby's apartment) have shifted from tapioca pearls to barley. Now, barley mash works for beer, but barley in tea? Hmmmm......

bindu said...

That's an interesting story, and such a nice ritual!

Bella Rum said...

Oh, Ruth,
"pudding it too mildly"
Ha, ha, ha! You're so punny.

I love, love the story behind this. My daughter-in-law grew up in Tajikistan. I am going to try this. How nice that we all have Noah in common. He really got around didn't he?

Thank you for sharing this with all of us.

VioletSky said...

Mmm, this sounds lovely. I think you have given me something completly different for our Christmas breakfast.
We should plan a trip to Colorado for that fruitcake toss!!

Peter said...

You get some nice surprises by surprising combinations! ... and this is of course an old tradition, I'm sure it must be good! However, for myself here, I may go for a simpler version and just go for the garnish part! ... and fresh figs (even the dry ones are nice)!

Yes, Saint Nicholas has is origins in Turkey, let's not forget! How he then became Father Christmas is a long story.

Snappy Di said...

I've never liked fruit cake either but was at a craft show in October and they were handing out small pieces of fruitcake. I tried it and to be honest it was fabulous! But I forgot to write down the brand of it so alas..... no fruitcake will I be sending you this year. LOL

Di
The Blue Ridge Gal

Anet said...

Ha! My Noah says the ingredients sound dreadful!
What does he know?
I think it sounds yummy.

Vagabonde said...

When we stayed in Turkey for 4 months when I was a child (5 years old) I remember a creamy kind of pudding and I did not like it at all, but I don’t remember its name. As for fruitcakes, when we lived in San Francisco a co-worker from Kentucky gave me a Bourbon fruit cake recipe. She said you cover the fruits with Bourbon and macerate them for a couple of hours. Well we went to so many parties that week that every night I had to add Bourbon to keep the fruits covered and I did that for a week instead of 2 hours. When I finally made the fruitcake it was very powerful and everyone loved it and said it did not taste like fruitcake. So now when I make it I keep the fruits in the Bourbon whiskey a week. We like to eat a cold, thin slice with a glass of eggnog.

Claudia said...

Wow! I'll give it a try, it certainly sounds exotic and enticing. I'm assuming Northern beans are haricot beans but I'll look it up. Thanks for sharing, I had never heard of this tradition (I wonder if it's only celebrated in Turkey). I don't know even 10 of my neighbors let alone 40!

kanmuri said...

That looks delicious!! I'm definitely going to try and make it when I go back to Canada.

Pat said...

What an interesting story, and quite an interesting recipe!

Shaista said...

Love your blog post as usual, I particularly look forward to the snippets of your life in Turkey and Istanbul that you weave in and out now and then. Just tonight I was reading the translation of Surah Teen to my father, the Surah of the Fig, a very special and sacred symbol within Islam. And apparently the fig tree derives from Ficus Indica or Bo-Tree, the tree under which Gautama Buddha achieved Enlightenment.
I love when religions discover their roots shared in other religions...

rauf said...

Ruth, normally people don't eat fruits that are abundantly available locally and go for fruits brought from far off places. Figs were scattered all over the place in Coorg in my childhood and i don't remember eating them, perhaps ate a few. Now in the city, they are precious to us. i don't know where pomegranates come from but they are always available fresh and blood red., i have seen a few trees in hotter areas. Dates figs and pomegranates are Biblical fruits and found in paradise. God could only think of fruits that are locally available.
God's local area is Arabia, Northern Africa and Turkey. Never went beyond that. God never knew of Jack fruits and mangoes of India oh i forgot bananas.
The description of the fruit of knowledge varies in different books. 'No Bananas in Paradise' is a good title for Coen Brothers movie. 'God goes Bananas' is another good title.

Obviously Noah was not a thinker, he could have told God, Look, i have to chop hundreds of trees to make the massive boat you want,
Its lot earier for you to scatter the clouds and avoid the floods.

Noah would have scratched his yeddu.

rauf said...

Ashura (Urdu) is the Tenth day of the month of Muharram (first Lunar month) It used to be a day of celebration until the tragic assassination of Hussain, the prophet's grand son (political, nothing to do with Islam ) Now it is a day of mourning. Shia's wear black for 40 days.

Ruth said...

CottageGirl, the beans are a real surprise, I agree. The dish makes a complete protein - with whole grain and legumes, which is nice for breakfast.

I would love to meet you in St. Louis, oh that reminds me: "Meet me in Saint Louie, Louie" - remember that from the World Fair and the movie?

Ruth said...

Thanks, Jean, I'm sure I don't know half the story.

Ruth said...

Gwen, it is hard to listen without thinking of the next thing you have to say. I imagine the U.N. and Copenhagen and most other forums as being a lot of force feeding of words without anybody swallowing them.

A simple gift of respect and appreciation, without thought of what might come in return, is rare, I'm afraid.

Ruth said...

Montag, thanks for the smile about the crow.

Sometimes I really like this pudding, sometimes I'm not so sure. It is a mixture that is interesting. If it weren't for the garnish, I am pretty sure I wouldn't like it so well. However, when I had it in Turkey, I loved it. So I don't know if I have found the perfect recipe online. I can't find my American Cook in Turkey cookbook!

Ruth said...

Dear Susie, I wish you could taste it before making it, because it is different, and I wouldn't want you going to all the trouble if you don't like it.

My niece made a "winter cake" and sent it to us, after Don mailed her some of his homemade vanilla, and it was very nice. I have no doubt that I would devour anything you cook, because you are good at choosing recipes.

Ruth said...

Hi, Cusp. I love mincemeat. My father-in-law and I are the only ones in the family who do, and so rather than bake an entire mincemeat pie (with mincemeat from a jar), we usually take turns buying each other pieces at bakeries around the holidays. There's nothing quite like it with coffee. It's complex, and so is this pudding. I don't imagine everyone would like it.

I have heard that İstanbul has changed a lot in 20 years, that it has lost some of its Orientness. But I hope you can get there and enjoy its beauties, old and new.

Ruth said...

Barry, Turks have an intensity about hospitality that is utterly unfamiliar to me. You see your best friend every day. You welcome people into your home often. If someone brings a dish of food to your door, you must never return the dish empty. If someone on the street asks directions, you must never say, "I don't know" - but rather tell them something, even if it is wrong, because if you don't offer them something, it would be considered rude - ayıp. Women meet in each others salons daily to chat, drink çay, and crochet. Sadly, with women going to work and people wanting to gobble up Western ways, these traditions are fading.

Ruth said...

Thanks, Ellen. Turkey is a dream vacation destination. Your dollar goes far, there is little regulation so you can see ruins up close and even walk on them. The richness of history, architecture, geography - you would need a month at least. You would love the Turkish tiles at Topkapı; you could replicate the designs in your glass. When we lived there they loved Americans. I don't know if they still feel that way.

margie said...

this past week i was at costco and saw that they had pomegranate seeds packaged loose. although part of the intrigue of the pomegranate is getting the seeds out, it is only intriguing for a very short time!!

Ruth said...

Loring, I never heard of the Boba Tea House until your comment. My goodness.

I hope you like this pudding. It is different and eclectic, and that, my friend, suits you.

Ruth said...

Bindu, there is much more behind the holiday that I don't know. rauf has posted more in his comment.

Ruth said...

Hi, Bella, I hope you like it. It was interesting to me when we lived in İstanbul how some of the dishes I cooked made Turks' stomachs turn. Like once I made oven baked chicken from my More With Less cookbook. This dish is made with curry and honey coating the chicken. I had several neighbors in the building ask what is that terrible smell? First, they don't understand or know or like curry. Second, they would not ever pair meat with sweet seasoning.

I wonder what your daughter-in-law will think of aşure.

rauf said...

Ruth, Its a government Holiday in India, a secular country. The day is important to both Shia and Sunni Muslims. Shia and Sunni divide is largely political, nothing to do with Islam.
Like January, Muharram is the first month of the lunar calender for Muslims. After Prophet's death according to Prophet's wishes Abu Bakr Known as Siddique,( a man who always spoke the truth) was chosen as the Caliph. The Prophet preferred seniority. The divide actually started right there. Some wanted The Prophet's cousin and Son-in-Law, Ali who was lot younger to be the Caliph. Everything ended in bloodshed. Ali was assassinated while praying, later his Son Hussain was assassinated on the tenth day of Muharram which was until then a day of festivities.

Sidney said...

Thank you !
This is a very nice custom!
Much better than Santa Claus actually.

Loring Wirbel said...

Ruth, "boba" is a generic term for the big pearls of tapioca (1/4" dia. type) they put into tea and chai. It's called "bubble tea" some places. The Boulder tea place was for the boba elite, but we have scads of boba tea houses around Colorado Springs.

♥ Kathy said...

What an interesting story! And the pudding looks good..I might have to try it :)

Amy said...

The pudding looks yummy! I LOVE pomegranates. I used to eat the seeds directly from the rind, trying to protect my clothing from the red stains. Since then, I've learned a new trick: Cut the pomegranate into fourths or sixths. Fill a bowl with cold water and break the seeds away from the rind under the water. No spraying of the juice onto skin or clothing, and, in case you're concerned, being submerged in water does not take away from the juicyness of the seeds. Additionally, the white "skins" will float, allowing you to easily separate the fleshy seeds from the unwanted bits!

Ruth said...

Violetski, I hope you like it. It is complicated.

I have in-laws in CO, let's start a caravan, and we can all crash at their place, or at Loring's.

Ruth said...

Oh, Peter, I'm afraid my version was not as good as what we were given graciously in İstanbul. I will need to find a better recipe for next year.

Fresh figs, dried figs, I love them all - that crunch combined with soft flesh.

Ruth said...

Di, if you remember it or find it again, come by and tell us in a comment. Thanks for the thought of sending one - ha!

Ruth said...

Anet, so I guess it isn't your Noah's pudding. You can tell him that by my fourth bowl I was getting tired of it. I should have given more away. He's welcome to come try it, and you too.

Ruth said...

Vagabonde, 'tis the holiday - pour on the bourbon, eh?

Just like science, mistakes become some of the best discoveries and inventions.

I did a taste test at the Jameson factory in Dublin - Scotch, Kentucky Bourbon, and Irish whiskey. I didn't like any of them, but I liked the Irish whiskey the best (of course), and the bourbon the least. It was very strong, you should have seen my face. Everyone laughed. Of course Jameson gave me a nice certificate since I picked the right one.

Ruth said...

No, Claudia, not haricot. These are the beans you put in cassoulet. I don't know what they're called in France.

We only know a few neighbors here too. Oh, I should blog about one (I haven't met but Don has) - they give horseback riding lessons to kids with disabilities.

dutchbaby said...

Oh Ruth, this recipe looks divine! I love all the ingredients. I think it will shoo out the last of my cold. Pomegranates have tons of anti-oxidants that can chase away all ills. If you tap the outside of a pomegranate with the back of a spoon before you open it, it rattles them out of their cells and they are a little less messy to prepare.

I treasure the fifty-year-old fig tree in our backyard. It produces beautiful light green figs with deep purple flesh on the inside. I think it is the most beautiful and best-tasting fig I have ever seen or tasted anywhere, but I think I'm a tad biased. I like to take fresh figs and stuff them with a soft cheese like brie or goat cheese and then I wrap each with prosciutto di parma. Then I place them under the broiler until the edges of the prosciutto get crispy brown. They make a delicious juicy hot appetizer.

I know I'm getting better now that I'm talking about food again.

Ginnie said...

Ohhhhhh. I loved finding out what Amy said about how she does pomegranates. She never told me this...and I just gave her a pomegranate a couple weeks ago. As soon as I see them in the stores, I always think of her because she loved them so much. She'd come home from school and sit at the table with a towel draped around her front. What a memory.

Noah's Pudding sounds delightful to me...especially because I love barley. Anything with barley in it has got to be good! Don't you love the memories you have from Turkey! BTW, there was a fig tree in our neighbor's yard behind the alley in Pasadena. I recall getting a few of them once. Like dates, I LOVE dried figs. Surely they are really good for what ails you! :)

Ruth said...

Kanmuri, great, I hope you like it!

Ruth said...

Thank you, Pat. In an ancient culture like Turkey's the history is so long and complex, I wish I knew more. Well, I can learn.

Ruth said...

Hello, Shaista. Yes, I forgot that ficus is fig. We had a huge house plant ficus that was very very beautiful my sister loaned us for years, not a fruit bearing tree this one.

I think if most Christians here realized how much we share with Muslims (they get the Jewish connection already) they would be astonished. In fact the teachings of the Qur'an are, I believe, more inclusive than other Scriptures when it talks about The People of the Book (Christians) - right?

Ruth said...

Oh thank you, rauf for that information. I saw something when I was scanning the Internet about the death of Hussain and I was too lazy to research it. In İstanbul we had friends who were Kurdish and friends who weren't. The non-Kurdish friends told us the Kurdish ones were Kurds, we didn't know. One way they said you can tell is that their children will be named Ali. They are Shia and honor Ali as their rightful prophet, as you explained.

Figs we can buy fresh must have come from far, though we do have trees in warmer areas. I don't think a hardy fig is available. I don't think I have tasted a good fresh fig that has been shipped, they are flavorless. The texture is still good, and when I eat one, I close my eyes and imagine what it is like to taste a good one off the tree again.

In Pasadena we had two avocado trees in our yard. I did not appreciate them then at all. We would take huge bags of them to work for friends. Now, they cost around two for a $1, or more, and I love them. You are so right about not wanting what we have readily available. Oh, we had a lemon tree too.

Thank you so much for the wealth of information about Ashura, rauf.

Ruth said...

Margie, hmm. I agree opening up those seeds and letting them out is part of the ethos of eating them. The one I peeled for Noah's pudding is in a bowl, still some seeds left. A little goes a long way. I was glad to see some peeling tips later in comments from Dutchbaby and Amy.

Ruth said...

rauf, I do believe there is no other place on earth like India where such a variety of peoples live together. I could be wrong, but I can't think of one. No wonder there are so many holidays and festivals.

Ruth said...

Sidney, you are surrounded with Catholic and Filipino rituals. When you share photographs of the people's faces, costumes, parades, I feel as if I am there. Christmas photos will be coming soon, I anticipate.

Ruth said...

Loring, wow, where have I been? Not in Colorado Springs, that's for sure.

Ruth said...

♥ Kathy, I hope you like it. I think I have to find a better recipe than this one, since it doesn't taste exactly like what I had in Turkey.

Ruth said...

Wow. Thanks, Amy. I never knew you were a pomegranate oficionado. I will try that next time. I really haven't eaten one in years, and I'm realizing that once you get all those seeds out, they last a long time, because a little goes a long way.

I really like the image your mom gave in her comment of you eating them after school with a towel around your neck. :)

Ruth said...

A well and healthy Dutchbaby is back!

Thank you for that spoon trick, I will try it, along with Amy's water bath method.

I read your appetizer description out loud to Don and we both groaned with pleasure/longing. It sounds like the perfect elements of sweetness, savoriness, crunch and ooze. Oh dear, I need some breakfast.

Ruth said...

Boots, well I loved finding out about Amy coming home from school, draping the towel, and devouring pomegranates.

Figs, dates, pomegranates - imagine the farmer who lived 100 years ago here where I am sitting. She would only read about them, maybe never eating one in her entire life.

ds said...

Late to the party. Am I too late for aşure? (Did I do that correctly? I used your character map :) ) It sounds yummy.

You have only increased my desire to see Turkey someday. Please thank rauf for me--I learned much from his comments as well as your post! Thank you.

shoreacres said...

I went looking for other instances of the pudding and was astounded by how many I found! Some used wheat, or rice, or both, some had haricorts, there was rosewater but no garnish, and a few that seemed to be all garnish! One recipe had 40 ingredients and took two days to make.

I loved the story, but I just am not sure I'd like the pudding.

But like fruitcake, the trick may be the right recipe. I make a fruitcake every year that contains only apricots, dates and pecans, with an orange zest and bourbon infused batter. And there's a cookie famous for making even fruitcake haters purr: bourbon-soaked raisins, candied cherries, citron and whole pecans, just held together with a thin batter infused with nutmeg, cinnamon, allspice and clove. This may be the weekend for baking!

Oh ~ If someone brings a dish of food to your door, you must never return the dish empty...
That was an absolute, iron-clad rule of my Iowa growing up, and remains so in portions of rural Texas.

Jeanie said...

Wow, what an interseting combination of ingredients. This sounds healthy, too! thanks for sharing both the recipe and the tradition. I love that idea.

Ruth said...

Bravo, Ms. DS. :)

Yes, you are late for aşure, I'm afraid. By the time I got to the end of the batch, I felt I wanted to find a different recipe for it. There are many out there, as Linda at shoreacres noted. I can't find my American Cook in Turkey cookbook! I'm frantic!

Nice to see you. :)

dutchbaby said...

Four used copies available this morning:

http://www.amazon.com/American-Cook-Turkey-Anne-Glass/dp/B000KUFJZG/ref=tmm_hrd_title_0

Send my your address and one just might show up in your mailbox.

Gwen Buchanan said...

I really enjoyed reading everyone's comments Ruth and

.... oh my gosh!!! "No bananas in Paradise" that is hilarious!!!!

great comedic relief rauf!!!

Vagabonde said...

Just tonight I was reading on another blog about Noah’s Ark landing on Mt Ararat as you also mentioned. So I looked it up because I had heard that in those days Mt Ararat was not in Turkey but in Armenia, and this is what I found in the Columbia Encyclopedia, so I thought I’d copy it for you too: “Ararat (ăr'ərăt), Turkish Ağri Daği, name of two mountains, Little Ararat (12,877 ft/3,925 m) and Great Ararat (16,945 ft/5,165 m), E Turkey, near the Iranian and Armenian borders. The tradition that Mt. Ararat is the resting place of Noah's ark is based on a misreading of Gen. 8.4, which properly reads "upon the mountains of Ararat," indicating a country or region. The land or the kingdom of Ararat, called in Assyrian Urartu, was situated between the river Aras (Araks) and the lakes Van and Urmia. It included all the land later called Armenia.” I thought it interesting because as you may know Mount Ararat has always been revered by the Armenians as symbolizing their national identity. Mt Ararat is the national symbol of the 1991 Republic of Armenia, being featured in the center of its coat of arms.

Ruth said...

Linda, I think I didn't find the right recipe here. I loved the pudding in Turkey, and this was fine, but not as delicious. I've already said it a few times, but where is my American Cook in Turkey cookbook???

What you said about the rule of returned hospitality in Iowa and Texas might validate what I felt in İstanbul, that traditions there were like what we had in the U.S. 50 years earlier.

Ruth said...

Well, Dutchbaby, you are an angel . . . I wonder what else I've lost and can't get along without? ;-)

I would protest, but I'm afraid it wouldn't do any good, and might be false anyway, because I really want it! Thank you so much. I emailed you my address. :D

Ruth said...

Hi, Gwen, I know. I love it when I learn more in comments, don't you?

That rauf, if we see a college spring break movie called "God Goes Bananas" I'll know he is well connected, as I suspect.

Ruth said...

Vagabonde, oh, that is very good research, my researching friend. I had never heard this, and it makes sense.

Doesn't it make you wonder how many things have been mistranslated over the years? We have no idea how meanings get altered, and we think we know so much!

I think you must have a PhD in some research field. If not, you should.

Vagabonde said...

Thanks Ruth for your nice compliment. No, I don’t have any kind of diploma in the researching field, but since childhood I have been very inquisitive and always wanted to know the what, where and why of everything and I am still like that. That has its good and bad points – many people care about myths and get angry when corrected. Thanks for your open mind.

medura said...

it looks very nice and delicious. elinize sağlık :)