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Wednesday, April 30, 2008

caught


The path through the little woods at the back of our five acres shows changes that have transpired through the winter. After the snow has melted, you can see the pine and spruce branches that have broken, fallen and gotten caught by other branches or vines.









Often needles and branches fall onto a neighboring tree of a different species. It's a simple thing, but I never tire of looking at the configurations these couplings make. The unity touches me.






And for a bonus, this pretty evergreen tree (sorry I don't remember the name) was covered with petals from the magnolia tree next to it at one of the gardens at my university.

18 comments:

Loring Wirbel said...

If I was one-tenth the photographer you were, I would share pictures of the entangling of Ponderosa Pine and scrub oak on my property. Dying pines are a big problem in this area, due to Ips beetle and pine-bark beetle -- many areas west of Salida, Colo. and west of Flagstaff, Ariz. are now virtually devoid of pines. Kind of like the dead-flower arrays on the Kathleen Edwards album cover, dead entanglements of pine and scrub.

Ginnie said...

I think there's a very good sermonette here, Ruth! We in the different countries of the world need to start "catching" each other....

Sharon said...

What a wonderful photographic essay! Thanks for showing us a little glimpse of the microcosmic. I would never have thought of the concept at all....you have a great eye and poetic mind! Thank you!!!

Anet said...

Beautiful pics. Those branches hanging on for dear life! It's one of the things that I have blogger friends for... to make me stop, slow down, think, enjoy, and create! Thanks Ruth!

Drowsey Monkey said...

You capture things I never think of! Some of them actually feel erotic, but in a non-weird way...you know, more like in a beautiful nature way. Okay, I'll stop typing now ;)

Ruth said...

Loring, was I just hearing about something like this in Canada? How sad and incredible that they are being wiped out like that. One of the joys of my life is driving north, getting to Clare, opening the window and smelling the pines. I'm sure the entomologists and botanists must be trying to stop it?

Ruth said...

Boots, if we were more in the flow of nature, it would be natural to catch each other.

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Sharon and Anet, I'm glad, because I noticed it for the first time here too. Like I wrote somewhere yesterday, last post comment I think, this property is teaching US all the time. Slowing down and paying attention.

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Drowsey, hehe, don't ever stop typing. I love that! Nature IS erotic, and I'm so grateful to be able to connect with that.

Astrid said...

Ruth, it was only a few days ago that you said to me that I have 'the eye', may I say that I think/know you have the eye too, this is only given to a few, you see things I would notice too, a whole series of these beautiful branches caught by anoher branch, is a great find, I am impressed.
The way you captured this is of great quality.
It is so true that a lot of people are blind of their surrounding, I am so glad I am able to 'see' things of beauty and notice it too....It only takes a little effort, yes nature is teaching us.
Thank you for sharing these wonderful pictures.

Gwen Buchanan said...

this is a beautiful tale of naturalness ...

I always thought we should be able to stand in one spot, turn in a circle and find enough to entertain our minds for a life time ...

and you have showed us that it's true...

thanks Ruth...

Ruth said...

Astrid, the great and simple thing is that if we each pay attention, we will each discover something new, as Gwen said, enough for a lifetime.

Some days things are clouded over, and that's usually my own mind at work. Then voila! next day there is that something I hadn't seen or appreciated, and the joy is there too.

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Gwen, yes yes yes. I love giving many minutes to study something, like a meditation on an apple, or an orange. Things have their own vibrations that can transport us!

mystic rose said...

I like Gwen's comment.

and the photos catch my attention. Its not just relaxing, but intriguing as well. Thanks, ruth!

freefalling said...

In the second photo, the stick looks like a little man struggling to climb up the tree.
And I love the little hula skirt in shot 8.
This year was my first year with our peach tree and I enjoyed watching the peaches fall to the ground and impale themselves upon little pieces of bark or get stuck in odd places in the tree.

Sandy said...

You definitely are a nature lover...aren't you? And somehow you make fallen branches sound and look beautiful...

sandy

Ruth said...

Thank you, Mystic. Yeah, Gwen's comment.

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Letitia, now I have to look at the photos again and use my imagination. Cool!

The peaches, I've never thought of them doing that, must be odd-looking! And I guess they'd have to be pretty ripe and soft.

>< : ><

Sandy, love of nature was latent in me until we moved to the farm in 2003. I needed this, and it pulled me in. I feel like a little kid with big eyes, seeing everything for the first time.

laura said...

Great eye, Ruth. Even more amazing is how you take what you see and integrate or synthesize it into an idea! I guess that's why the bolg's called Synchronizing! These photos are very touching, something, in my hands incoherent, about not letting go.

Ruth said...

That's cool, Laura, thank you. And the letting go seems effortless. Just by being there, they catch what falls.

Bob Johnson said...

Lol drowsey, I also never thought of the entanglement of other plants and trees, very cool, you have a good eye for picking these things out, love the first image of the walkway, If it could somehow have a Moon at the end of the path at twilight,lol, gotta get a Moon on there somewhere.

Ruth said...

Hehe, Bob, I'll try my best to get a moon in my next photo. But you do it so well for the rest of us, I just don't feel bad about not having one.